Eat Your Water: 12 Hydrating Healthy Fruits and Vegetables

Water in these foods counts toward your daily needs and they’re nutritious, too

Robert Roy Britt
Elemental
Published in
4 min readJul 15, 2020

--

Photo: Yulia Reznikov/Getty Images

The human body is 55–60% water, and it needs a fresh daily supply for proper digestion, to keep organs functioning, joints lubricated, and otherwise stay healthy. But you don’t have to drink all the water you need. You can just eat some of it. Fruits and vegetables all contain water, and many are mostly water.

There’s no formal federal guideline for how much water you need, but independent groups say the average adult woman should consume about 11.4 cups of fluid per day and men should take in 15.6 (a cup equals eight ounces).

The total amount of fluid can come in the form of plain water, coffee, tea, or other beverages, soup, water-laden food like milk or yogurt, or produce. The water in any of those foods contributes to your daily needs, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

Multiple benefits

Unlike juice or soda, which nutritionists discourage (especially for children) for their lack of fiber and nutrients and overload of sugar or other sweeteners, whole fruits and vegetables are also exceptionally good for you, providing fiber and vital nutrients, says Wesley McWhorter, DrPH, a…

--

--

Robert Roy Britt
Elemental

Editor of Aha! and Wise & Well on Medium + the Writer's Guide at writersguide.substack.com. Author of Make Sleep Your Superpower: amazon.com/dp/B0BJBYFQCB