Now Women Are Putting Cannabis in Their Vaginas

Vaginal cannabis suppositories have grown in popularity, but their safety and efficacy are still up for debate

Brittany Risher
Elemental
Published in
4 min readJan 28, 2020

--

Suppositories containing CBD are seen on display in a shop in Paris. Photo: Geoffroy Van Der Hasselt/AFP/Getty Images

SSince 2010, Stepfanie Romine, 38, has suffered with intense monthly menstrual cramps. “My pelvis feels like it’s tightening and pulling down, and my entire body feels like it’s trying to contract,” she says. Like approximately 32% of women, Romine’s menstrual pain caused her to miss work. “I was tired of losing a day every month to cramps,” she says.

Doctors ruled out fibroids, endometriosis, and cysts; their only guess is that hormonal imbalances are causing them. Though she tried painkillers and heating pads, nothing seemed to dull the pain.

Then, one day last year, an ad for Foria CBD suppositories popped up in her Facebook feed. Romine, who considers herself “really well-versed” in natural health after working for an herbal supplement company for several years, was intrigued.

At least two companies currently sell intravaginal products containing CBD and THC (or just THC) that are marketed to help with menstrual pain, and another company is developing products. (Any consumer can have the CBD products shipped to them; the THC products are available only to people who live in states where THC is legal.)…

--

--

Brittany Risher
Elemental

Content strategist, editor, and writer specializing in health and wellness. www.brittanyrisher.com