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Elemental
Your life, sourced by science. A publication from Medium about health and wellness.

Menstruation

In Elemental. More on Medium.

Girls need to learn that a period is natural, not shameful

Photo: wuestenigel/Creative Commons

In her new book, “Period. End of Sentence.” (Scribner, 2021), New York Times bestselling author and award-winning journalist Anita Diamant sheds light on the ways in which menstrual injustice threatens the education, health, and dignity of some of the world’s most vulnerable populations.


A long history of dismissing women’s experiences in medicine may be limiting reported side effects in clinical trials

a Black woman wearing a blue sleeveless top receives a bandaid after receiving a vaccination from a white-appearing woman whose face is away from the camera
a Black woman wearing a blue sleeveless top receives a bandaid after receiving a vaccination from a white-appearing woman whose face is away from the camera
Photo by CDC on Unsplash

Vaccine trials include tens of thousands of people in phase 3 to ensure that even rare side effects are more likely to be detected. But once the vaccine is authorized and millions of people have begun receiving it, sometimes researchers learn about other even rarer side effects not captured in the trials. But scientists could also miss a side effect if they simply don’t ask about it — or don’t record it when participants report it.


Physicians are learning to ask more questions about periods to get a better understanding of a person’s overall health

An illustration of a woman holding a glowing tear drop.
An illustration of a woman holding a glowing tear drop.
Illustration: Sophi Gullbrants

It happens monthly, for two up to seven days at a time. A woman will menstruate for about seven years during her lifetime, on average. And yet there are still plenty of unknowns and misunderstandings around the effect menstruation has on women’s health.


Devotees of cycle syncing argue that tracking their physical and mental fluctuations helps them to plan better for everything from workouts to social time

Credit: Ekaterina79/Getty Images

For the past five months, 27-year-old Sara Robbert has been tracking her menstrual cycle — in a graph-ruled notebook, scribbling down a sentence each day about how she feels. Every 28 days or so, she has a new set of data points, which she mentally adds to an ever-expanding portrait of her own emotional and physiological patterns.

Elemental

Your life, sourced by science. A publication from Medium about health and wellness.

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