The Self-Care Treats I’d Love to Give Dr. Anthony Fauci

The man deserves rest, extravagance, and a basket of time

Sarah Stankorb
Elemental
Published in
4 min readJan 25, 2022

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The White House from Washington, D.C., Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

In this time of Omicron, when I keep a mental list of which friends and colleagues are quarantining due to Covid diagnosis or exposure, when thousands just mingled and shouted at an anti-vaccine mandate rally at the National Mall, hearing Dr. Anthony Fauci’s voice on the radio always perks my ears. Last week, I caught the end of an NPR interview in which a listener called in to ask what Dr. Fauci does for self-care.

Fauci, who faced Donald Trump’s scorn and threats incited by figures such as Senator Rand Paul, seemed taken aback, touched by the question. He admitted he hasn’t been as good about self-care as one should be. He’s been busy, you see.

Threatened and maligned, many state top docs and public health officials have resigned. One-in-five health care professionals have quit, citing trauma, exhaustion, and a bone-weary numbness.

Hearing Fauci’s note of surprise that someone might ask after his self-care, the brief respite that helps one slog through the next hard day, I imagined the care package I’d love to send the person whose voice, more than most, has brought calm and reason during a time of chaos and uncertainty.

I’d want to send a timpano, but maybe lighter on the eggs than the one he makes each Christmas. He’s not really one for supplements — maybe vitamin D if you are deficient or a couple grams of vitamin C — but I picture a nice basket of antioxidant-rich berries.

And some ear-savers for the man we know wears his mask.

Perhaps gift cards for his favorite local takeout, with extra so he can invite his grown children over for an easy but spirit-sustaining family dinner.

I’d love to provide some spiffy new kicks for his evening power walks with his wife. Maybe some sort of hydration system? His wife, Christine Grady, though is reportedly already on it, reminding him to drink plenty of water.

I imagine that, regardless of the time of year, a sort of distracting beach read, even as audiobook, might do him some good. I asked a friend who has read and written about romance novels for a recommendation. She suggested…

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Sarah Stankorb
Elemental

Sarah Stankorb has published with The Washington Post, Marie Claire, Glamour, O, and The Atlantic (among others). @sarahstankorb www.sarahstankorb.com