The Crumbling Reputation of Granola Bars

As Clif and KIND bars feud on social media, a dietitian shares which bars end up in his cart

Andy Bellatti MS, RD
Elemental
Published in
4 min readJun 19, 2019

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Illustration: Dora Godfrey/Getty

TTaylor Swift and Katy Perry recently quashed their years-long social media beef, but the makers of Clif and KIND bars are going at it like bitter rivals over who has the superior — or in this case “healthier” — offering (see this tweet and the comments section of this Facebook post to get a gist of the feud).

To quote Swift’s latest, Clif and KIND both need to calm down because, in my opinion, neither one stands out as a top choice.

Although Clif bars are oat-based and some varieties contain heart-healthy fats from peanuts, almonds, and hazelnuts, other varieties are quite high in added sugar and get a good portion of their fats from added oils which are less nutrient-rich than whole foods sources of fat. Compared to the wide array of bars out there, Clif bars fall in “middle of the pack” territory (bonus points for the company’s commitment to organic agriculture, which is important from both an ecological and sustainability standpoint).

With only four or five grams of sugar, some KIND bars have less sugar than a classic Clif bar (average of 20 grams). But those low sugar options contain palm kernel oil (not the healthiest of oils) and alkalized…

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Andy Bellatti MS, RD
Elemental

Dietitian with whole-food, plant-centric approach. No, you don't need a juice cleanse.