Yes, You Develop Some Immunity to Covid-19. The Question Is, How Much?

Experts say it would be ‘extremely bizarre’ if people didn’t develop some immunity to Covid-19

Allie Volpe
Elemental
Published in
6 min readMay 27, 2020

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Illustrated T helper cell and interleukin molecule. Photo: Juan Gaertner/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Among the many lingering questions surrounding the coronavirus and its long-term impact on the body is the likelihood of developing immunity after recovering from the virus. And if people do develop immunity, how long does it last? An important step toward reopening the country, determining who has immunity against reinfection, and what level of protection immunity confers can help establish the risk of sending large groups of people back to work.

Back in March, Anthony Fauci, MD, the director of the National Institute of Allergies and Infectious Diseases and the country’s leading infectious disease expert, said in an appearance on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah he would be “willing to bet anything that people who recover are really protected against reinfection.” A few weeks later, the World Health Organization released a statement explaining there existed “no evidence that people who have recovered from Covid-19 and have antibodies are protected from a second infection.”

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Allie Volpe
Elemental

Writes about lifestyle, trends, and pop psychology for The Atlantic, New York Times, Rolling Stone, Playboy, Washington Post, and more.